Mark Anderson to Speak on “The Benefits of Public Broadband”

connecttheworld
Connect with the World Conference on October 9 in Mount Vernon to Focus on the Benefits of Publicly Owned Broadband Infrastructure

Local and national private sector and government leaders will meet in Mount Vernon, Washington, on October 9, 2014 to discuss the benefits of publicly owned broadband infrastructure during the innovative Connect with the World Conference.
 

Get Tickets: http://mcintyrehall.org/scheduled_event.asp?sid=1303

 

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2110463#ixzz3AD1yTxFB

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Microsoft and the Smartphone Problem

From Seattle’s Crosscut.com:

Strategic News Service CEO Mark Anderson comments on What Microsoft’s job cuts really mean for the company.

Read the article at Crosscut.

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Neal Stephenson: It’s time to grow past ‘silly little apps’

Sci-fi author Neal Stephenson writes books about cyber punks who spend their free time in a virtual world and deliver pizzas on high-speed skateboards. In real life, though, he’s concerned about something a little more down to earth: Getting past the app.

Fellow sci-fi scribe David Brin asked Stephenson about his predictions for the next year during a session at the Future in Review technology conference in Laguna Beach on Friday. His response was equal parts hopeful and sad: “The brightest people of our generation will raise their sights a little bit from working on silly little apps and try to do something that is more momentous.”

It’s a phenomenon he feels is driven by capitalism. “The whole ecosystem of little start-ups in the Bay Area making little apps is one that is sort of tailor-made for the VC environment.”

“I have to wonder how much longer that can go.”

“If I were a capitalist that’s what I would be asking myself: Are there opportunities there in the way of doing big, ambitious things that everyone else is missing because they’re so focused on doing little start-ups?”

Brin, ever the attentive interviewer, took the bait, suggesting a kaleidoscope of high-tech solutions to global scale problems.

Stephenson was more subdued. “I’d settle for roads,” he deadpanned.

 

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The real Japanese economy? High-tech

Japan’s economy has been misconstrued by the interests of American auto companies and pork exporters. That’s according to Japan expert Scott Foster, who said the two industries have stolen more than their fair share of headlines about Japan. Foster, an advisor to TAP Japan, alliance partner at Translink, and SNS Ambassador for Asia, spoke to the audience at Future in Review Friday morning about how he sees the real Japanese economy.

What does that look like? “We have an economy that is very mature and has limited growth potential,” he said. Even with an activist government. That’s not a bad thing: Japan’s economy makes up a hefty 8-9 percent of the world economy, unemployment is just 3-4 percent and Japan is still dominating in industries like the manufacture of precision technological components, cars and LNG engineering.

“The Google phone will be using processors from Toshiba,” he explained. “So, they have their niche and it’s a very high-tech niche.”

They are also capitalizing on the misfortune of other national economies. “They don’t have a banking crisis now,” Foster explained. “They had theirs 20 years ago.” So, he says, the Japanese have been scooping up assets dumped by cash-strapped financial institutions around the world during the financial crisis.

Foster believes that worry about Abenomics, the economic policy named after Japanese prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has proved unfounded. Instead Japan has seen top line GDP growth, corporate profits through the roof, and increased tax revenues. Businesses, through an agreement with the government, have raised wages and bonuses, which has driven more growth.

“The premise of Abenomics was totally different than Wall Street Journal thinking or Western economic thinking,” Foster said. Abenomics, he said, gets one key thing right: “If you don’t have money in people’s pockets, it’s not going to generate growth.”

Still, Japan’s biggest challenge, its huge national debt, is yet to come. “More has to be done and the easy part has been finished,” Foster explained. “From now on, it’s going to be a lot harder.”

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The Next Generation In Medicine

Mobile technology is altering the way we live, driving change and affecting every industry. In a discussion with Kathryn McKenzie, COO of Telstra and Chetan Sharma, President, Chetan Sharma Consulting on the future of technology, Tom Taylor, VP, Advanced Strategy, Verizon said, “Mobile has become the underpinning of the national economy.”

 

Sharma asked the short yet loaded question, “What’s to come in the next 5 years?”

 

Taylor and McKenzie agreed that the network will evolve to faster speeds and lower latency. With more bandwidth caused by increased connected devices, a strain on networks will continue to require more and more carriers to use more services and the network more dynamically. McKenzie highlighted, “From a network perspective we will need to be good at integrating all of the technologies to make a good end-user experience for customers.”

 

Additionally, software will continue to commoditize the hardware. “There will be a move away from hardware specific into flexible software and of course, the cloud. It gives you a lot more flexibility” noted Taylor.

 

It would be a miss to discuss the future, without touching on drones, wearables and connected cars. Verizon’s Taylor predicted “Five years from now the car will be like another tablet on your carrier plan” and “We will see more information coming into the car, with less distraction.”

 

Unlike 5 years ago, today, we hold our phones while we walk. In 5 years, this will be outdated, to be replaced by wearable devices that enable the smartphone to be an aggregator of content and devices. The audience at Future in Review (FiRe) conference were  encouraged to look at  drones beyond the media perception of a “delivery service” but as an asset for industries such as public safety and agriculture.

 

The future of telecoms will bring both challenges and opportunities and the open question remains, as always-on connections among people, process, data, and things become more pervasive, will the lines between work, technology and the rest of life continue to blur?

 

People typically get serious about their health in their mid-50s, however a growing body of research indicates that starting years earlier is the most effective way to reduce the risk of disease.

 

Thursday afternoon at Future in Review (FiRe) conference, Samir Damani, Founder and CEO, MD Revolution, Jonathan DeHart, President and CEO, NorthShore Bio, William Hearl, Founder and CEO, Immunomic Therapeutics and Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2, UC San Diego/UC Irvine discussed actions they are taking to make preventative healthcare a reality.

 

DeHart is focused on bringing biotechnology, computing, and semiconductor manufacturing together to accelerate the revolution in ‘digital biology’. He is laser focused on solving the “molecular information” problem and with the help of his team is developing electrical sensors to advance the capability and speed of molecular measurement.

 

Immunomic Therapeutics is a biotechnology company that develops protein-based vaccines for the treatment of allergy and other human health targets. Hearl said, “I live in the world of proteins which are 3 dimensional” and predicted that in order to harness the power of proteins, “We will need additional computing power… think about disease as a software bug, that is where we are going.”

 

According to panelists, a key trend is wearable health and fitness devices that provide patients with data that previously was only in doctors’ hands.  Patients now use this data to take charge of their health and wellness which ultimately results in a healthier quality of life.  Smarr concluded that, “Quantitative information drives behavior.”

 

Damani summed up the discussion nicely, “”Medicine is about understanding disease at its root…Genetic information is the result of  the correlation between disease and predisposition.”​

 

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Meet the next generation of medicine

People typically get serious about their health in their mid-50s. However, a growing body of research indicates that starting years earlier is the most effective way to reduce the risk of disease.

Thursday afternoon at the Future in Review (FiRe) conference, Samir Damani, Founder and CEO, MD Revolution, Jonathan DeHart, President and CEO, NorthShore Bio, William Hearl, Founder and CEO, Immunomic Therapeutics and Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2, UC San Diego/UC Irvine discussed actions they are taking to make preventative healthcare a reality.

DeHart is focused on bringing biotechnology, computing and semiconductor manufacturing together to accelerate the revolution in ‘digital biology’. He is laser focused on solving the “molecular information” problem and, with the help of his team, is developing electrical sensors to advance the capability and speed of molecular measurement.

Immunomic Therapeutics is a biotechnology company that develops protein-based vaccines for the treatment of allergy and other human health targets. Hearl said, “I live in the world of proteins which are 3 dimensional.” In order to harness the power of proteins, he predicted, “We will need additional computing power… think about disease as a software bug. That is where we are going.”

According to panelists, a key trend is wearable health and fitness devices that provide patients with data that previously was only in doctors’ hands. Patients now use this data to take charge of their health and wellness which ultimately results in a healthier quality of life. Smarr concluded that, “Quantitative information drives behavior.”

Damani summed up the discussion nicely, “”Medicine is about understanding disease at its root… Genetic information is the result of the correlation between disease and predisposition.”​

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3D Printing and Graphene Are The Future of Production

3D printing and graphene have emerged over the past few years as some of the hottest technology topics in the world.  The ideas of printing whatever you so please, including multiple separate components simultaneously, and the nearly unlimited potential of the physical properties of graphene have an undeniable sex appeal.  Beyond the media buzz, however, lies the real-world issue of how to realize these potentials and create usable products.  So how do we further that realization?

In a panel led by Graphene Stakeholders Association Cofounder and Co-Executive Director Stephen Waite today, FiRe attendees were given a grounded perspective of the issues at hand.  Waite noted that while the excitement about graphene (which mimics that over materials such as ceramics, CBD’s and carbon nanotubes in the past) may seem overblown, it is justly based in the tangible properties of the material. Keith Blakely, CEO of the InVentures Group, explained that graphene is 300 times stronger than steel, has an electron mobility 150 times that of silicon, and permits a current density 1 million times that of copper.  The material stands as the strongest, most conductive substance known to man.

Jon Myers, Founder and CEO of Graphene Technologies, noted that while graphene is indeed a fantastic substance, we don’t yet know exactly what to do with it.  Myers took this fact and ran with it: Graphene Technologies specializes in R&D to solve that problem.  Between now and this fall, Myers explained, the company will be working to create applicable polymers that meet specs they have received from clients.  While the substance’s nature renders it difficult to work with, Myers stated that his firm was “very close to a breakthrough that would put us on a commercial track.”

Gonzalo Martinez, Director of Strategic Research at the Office of the CTO at Autodesk, explained the bumps in the road to effective 3D printing.  Citing the fact that 3D printers can use 110 materials so far, Martinez noted that “in the manufacturing arena that is absolutely nothing.”  His frustration with 3D printing firms’ reluctance to explore new materials led Martinez to the conclusion that the technology must be open source.  With the opening of the API for 3D printing, Martinez hopes to expand the materials side of development, a move based in part on the Google model for cellular technology.

While Martinez’ decision led predictably to “a lot of pretty nasty e-mails”, it could very well be a boon for us all.  With an increase in materials capabilities on the 3D printing side and the perfection of graphene polymer production, we stand at a very exciting time for the two technologies.  With a high possibility of the trajectories meeting, the question “What can we make with graphene?” may soon become “What can’t we?”

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Missed a Wednesday Breakout Session? Some takeaways

1. FiRe CTO Design Challenge: Working Session: “Privacy Vs. Security: Finding a Technology Solution”

The Challenge Team: Barry Briggs, IT Chief Architect and CTO, Microsoft; Hugh Bradlow, CTO and Head of Innovation, Telstra; Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2, UC San Diego/UC Irvine (HQ Qualcomm Institute), UCSD; Kevin Surace, CEO, Appvance; Simon Aspinall, Chief of Vertical Markets, Strategy, and Marketing, Virtustream; David Schoenberger, CIO/CTO, Secure Cloud Systems; Thomas Aidan Curran, CTO Imarum GmbH

2. “Saving the Biggest Brains in Washington – The Orca Whale Protection Zone”: Moderated by Bruce Stedman, Executive Director, Orca Relief Citizens’ Alliance; Con Slobodchikoff, CEO, Animal Communications Ltd.; and Roger Payne, Founder and President, Ocean Alliance

3. FiRe Global Rescue System Update: “Using Technology to Reduce Human Trafficking”: Moderated by Hugh Bradlow, CTO and Head of Innovation, Telstra; and Andrew Wallis, Founder and CEO, Unseen

4. “A Revolution in Healthcare”: A conversation with Samir Damani, Founder and CEO, MD Revolution; William Hearl, CEO, Immunomic Therapeutics; Jessica Richman, CEO, uBiome; and Jonathan DeHart, President and CEO, NorthShore

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Mark Hurd: Oracle is unleashing marketing as a service

Oracle co-president Mark Hurd told FiRe-goers this morning that the company is adding a new product to its cloud suite: Marketing as a service.

When Hurd took to the stage Thursday morning, his company was just 50 cents behind IBM’s market cap. Still, he urged FiRe chair and interviewer Mark Anderson not to talk about it too much, telling him he was going to jinx it.

As in past years at FiRe, Hurd emphasized the importance of social media as a critical disruptor of the customer service industry. “I believe that this method of communicating and talking is going to change everything we do.”

When he was in business school, he said, he was taught that 95 percent customer satisfaction was perfect: Anything beyond that was not supposed to be worth the effort put into it.

These days, he’s seeing things differently: If 5 percent of your customer base is unhappy and talking about it on social media? It becomes very bad for your company.  “This dearth of data is going to turn into a real challenge for all of us.”

In this atmosphere, companies will need to focus on doing due diligence on their customers and establishing deeper, longer-term relationships with them. And quickly: Hurd told the FiRe audience that Oracle’s inbound leads convert in the 1 percent range — and that leads lose interest just two hours after the last touch. “The best process,” he said, “is to automate that [sales pipeline] up front.”

Enter Oracle’s new marketing as a service offering, which Hurd told FiRe audience members allows companies to stay coordinated and innovative without having to break the bank modifying apps.

“You’re lowering costs and increasing innovation, both hopefully at the same time.”

Superior security is a must. The Chinese-government backed hackers accused of IP theft, he says, are far from the only perpetrators. “This is going on every single day. We all know it’s happening.” Oracle though is taking a slightly different tack. “A lot of people are trying to secure the perimeter. We’re trying to secure the data.”

So far, that’s working. “To my knowledge,” he said, “no Oracle database has ever been penetrated. There’s been many attempts.”

So how does he keep his own team on task? “The biggest job is leadership,” Hurd said. “We’ve got 130,000 people, not all of whom execute perfectly. But we’re trying to keep them going north.”

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Philip Low can diagnose you while you sleep

Dr. Philip Low cannot read your mind. At least not in the traditional sense. He can, however, diagnose a range of mental and other illnesses while you sleep using a single brain sensor about the size of three pennies.

“We get rid of the ‘electrode medusa’ of sleep labs with a single sensor,” Low explained to the audience of the Future in Review conference Thursday afternoon. Using that sensor and brain imaging, Low’s company Neurovigil has identified biomarkers of specific diseases.

At one point Low, working with the Navy on a project, did a blind test of his sensor on a patient from across the country. Without any previous knowledge of the patient, he was able to correctly diagnose brain trauma and PTSD and to determine that depression and pschizophrenia were not present.

About a year ago, for the first time, his technology helped an ALS patient communicate by moving a computer cursor to form words using only his brain. These days, Stephen Hawking is a patient too and NASA is using the Neurovigil brain monitor on astronauts in space.

Next up he is creating an organization called Neurozone, an innovations incubator for brain technologies modeled after the Boston Business Hub. He’s excited at the prospect of being able to diagnose more diseases as he receives more and more data and feedback from patients, though he wants to keep diagnoses in-house. “When we’re talking about the brain, I don’t want people to self-diagnose.”

Coming down the pike: Low says self-designed evolution through cognitive enhancement will have interesting results in the years ahead.

Not bad for a guy who got his start by studying the brain patterns of birds.

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